Wednesday, 24 July 2013

Friday's Tunnel - John Verney

Illustrated by John Verney himself

I was given Friday's Tunnel to read as a child. For many years I read it about once every six months. It was very different to other books for girls, and I identified with the 'tomboyish' main character February Callendar.

Friday's Tunnel was written in 1959, with some attitudes reflecting the age. However, February is a bright and brave 12 year old, who leads the search for her missing journalist father. Augustus (Gus) is an ex-MP (left-ish, but no party specified), a respected journalist, and an expert on a tiny Mediterranean island, Capria, where he spent the war. The book is set at height of the 'Cold War' - before 'Bay of Pigs'. When an international incident blows up over Capria and the USA and Russia start sabre rattling Gus is sent out to the island to report for his paper, but somehow disappears before he leaves the UK.

February, with help from her brother Friday, and a student, Robin, who was sent to tutor them for the summer as well as various of the mass of younger daughters sets out to solve the disappearance. Along side this is the story of Friday's tunnel, which he is digging with help from the many young sisters.

Some of the language used is dated, as are references to Danny Kaye and Woody Woodpecker. The attitudes of the period are largely clear through the mother, January, who despite being 'not very strong because of having so many children' is pregnant again. She is very much a stay at home mother who is described as 'beautiful' and spends most of her time burning food. January seems far less of an influence on February than her father.  Despite the way her mother is portrayed February is spirited and intelligent. She is largely allowed to ride anywhere on her horse although she is warned off going near a particular area by her father before he disappears. This was an age where children were far less supervised than today.

I thought that I wouldn't like the book, that I would find the world of the late 1950s too far removed, but I was wrong. Yes, there are plot holes, the reason for the international crisis is not possible, but it seemed like it was a valid reason - the story should still hook kids. I still like the book, I still like February Callendar, even now. 

There is another reason why I like the book, something I had completely forgotten about through the many years since I last read it. I am not going to spoil the plot - just in case anyone gets the chance to read it - but it has a lot to do with my interests now. In fact I do wonder if this book percolated through to my subconcious and has actually affected my life now.

Thursday, 18 July 2013

Dream of the dead - Phil Rickman

Why did I think this was a good idea to read? Well, it's set in countryside near where my mother lived for many years, and also where some of my ancestors came from. It had good reviews on Amazon, it was cheap, and I fancied some fiction. Time for some crime.

Perhaps you know Merrily Watkins, she's a decendant of Alfred Watkins, who invented 'ley lines' - Mrs Watkins - bit of a problem here? No? perhaps she married her cousin. Or perhaps, after the tragic death of her husband she reverted to her maiden name - but then why Mrs? I acknowledge, I haven't read any of Rickman's other books, so perhaps this is explained elsewhere, but this is the kind of thing that tends to niggle in my mind while I'm reading.

I don't read a lot of fiction, possibly because these kind of niggles irritate and jar in my mind - I don't tend to flow over them, they leave a 'niggle mark' in my mind.

Watkins is an Anglican Vicar in Ledwardine. She's exactly the kind of vicar everyone wants, kind, putting herself out, going beyond the requirements of the job. Giving time, sympathy, support. She also smokes, swears and sleeps with her boyfriend, who is a tortured, but brilliant, musician.

Overall this was OK, not great, but OK. It entertained, despite the niggles and the plot holes. When you read crime fiction you have to suspend disbelief, you have to accept that the trail of deaths described is possible. You have to ignore the flimsy reasons given.  I know that powerful and respected people do hire hit men (think Jeremy Thorpe), but given the popularity of this trope in crime fiction you would think that there is no-one left to 'hit'.

I won't give too much away, although the plot centres around archaelogists and the 'Rotherwas Ribbon' - a unique archaeological feature in Herefordshire. There are archaeologists and atheists - who are generally treated sympathetically, despite the heroine being a member of the clergy. There is also a fundamentalist, who is treated somewhat less sympathetically.

What does seem nonsensical is the heroine's daughter, a pagan, who wants to be an archaeologist. She doesn't seem to practice any pagan rites (or not in this book), but wants to become an archaeologist because of 'ley lines' and the magical faerie world of ancient sites. What? Is this some kind of female Indiana Jones working with magical archaeology? At some point someone says that if you take away the magic you end up with a few bones and pot shards. No, sorry, that is not what makes archaeology interesting. It's the peeling away of layers of history, finding out what REALLY happened, how people REALLY lived. Not yet another neo-mystical idea of something for which there is no evidence.

I know it's a story... but... Perhaps it's time to go and read some real archaeology. To be honest, I used to be interested in this kind of thing. Not any more, I came to realise it isn't scientifically supportable.

6/10 - wouldn't bother to read it again, wouldn't bother to read another in the series, but not a complete waste of time. At least I got to hear about the Rotherwas Ribbon.

Thursday, 11 July 2013

The Big Necessity: adventures in human waste - Rose George

This was not an easy book to read. I did, at times, consider going and reading something else, because it is distressing. Very...

The book is about human waste, poo/shit in particular, although urine is also addressed.

There are more than 7 billion humans on the planet. An adult human produces some 250 gms of faeces a day - children somewhat less - let's say 200 gms of poo on average.

That means 7 billion x 200 gms - about 1400 million kilos of poo per day. Multiply that by 365 days per year... and yes, you can imagine. We are drowning in shit.

Shit is full of bacteria and parasites. Billions of people in the world have NO toilet, no, not a pit, not a latrine, they have no toilet facilities whatsoever. This means that their waste goes into the local fields and wasteland - where the flies have a field day - before flying off to walk all over any nearby food, and the effluent seeps into the water tables. Or they shit in the street, not because they want to, but because they have nowhere else to go. When the rains come, so does cholera.

In some parts of Africa the 'helicopter toilet' is common. Shit in a plastic bag, whirl it around your head, let go...

The charities and politicians are interested in clean water, because it is high profile, acceptable, but you can't have clean water if there is no safe disposal of effluent. Toilets provided are often pit latrines, with no way of emptying them. Once full, or without maintenance, they are pointless, and people go back to the traditional open air methods.

Even the so called 'civilised' west, where we have flushing toilets... where does that go? Into the rivers or the sea, or the 'sludge' is treated, and then spread onto farmland. This sounds like a good idea, get the nutrients back into the soil, but it isn't. Vast quantities of chemicals, some toxic, are also fed into the sewage system, these cannot be detoxified, they are also spread onto our land, where our food grows.

Did you know, that the thing that terrifies London sewage workers most is FOG? Fat, Oil and Grease. It clogs the sewers of London, building into thick, hard layers. They aren't allowed to use jack hammers on it any more, but it still needs to be removed. Where does it come from? Restaurants disposing of excess fats down the sinks and toilets. The Leicester Square areas is supposed to be particularly bad.

The whole topic is, quite simply, disgusting. But I don't actually know what we can do about it.